Sep 23, 2019  
2010-2011 Denver Campus Catalog 
    
2010-2011 Denver Campus Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Chemistry


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Chair: Mark R. Anderson
Program Assistant: Laura Cuellar
Office:
North Classroom, 3002
Telephone:
303-556-4885
Fax:
303-556-4776
Web site:
 clas.ucdenver.edu/chemistry/

Faculty

 
Professors:
Larry G. Anderson, PhD, Indiana University
Mark R. Anderson, PhD, University of Wisconsin
Robert Damrauer, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Douglas Dyckes, PhD, Case Western Reserve University
James H. Hageman, PhD, University of California, Los Angeles
John A. Lanning, PhD, University of Tennessee
 
Associate Professors:
Doris R. Kimbrough, PhD, Cornell University
Xiaotai Wang, PhD, University of Virginia
 
Assistant Professors:
Karen Knaus, PhD, Cleveland State University
Hai Lin, PhD, University of Science and Technology of China
Yong Liu, PhD, University of Michigan
Scott Reed, PhD, University of Oregon
 
Instructors:
Margaret Bruehl, PhD, Northwestern University
Priscilla Burrow Crocker, PhD, University of Colorado
Marc Donsky, PhD, University of California, Berkeley
Lisa Lanning, PhD, University of Vermont

 

Undergraduate

Why study chemistry? A practical reason is that our highly technical society faces many problems that can be solved through an understanding of the science of chemistry and its methods of solving problems. A more intangible reason is that chemistry is central to a variety of other disciplines and that many problems ultimately will have chemical solutions.

At the undergraduate level, students can prepare for:

  1. careers in chemical and medical laboratories
  2. careers in nursing, medical technology, dental hygiene and other health-oriented fields
  3. post-baccalaureate programs in chemistry, biology, biochemistry, medicine, physical therapy and dentistry.

At the graduate level, an MS degree program is offered. Students with MS degrees have job opportunities in research and technical laboratory services. In addition, flexible programs can be designed to combine chemical knowledge and skills with other interests of the MS-level student (e.g., biology or environmental science).

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REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR 

BS/MS PROGRAM 

Departmental Honors

Qualified students are encouraged to participate in the chemistry honors program. Three levels of honors are awarded by the Downtown Campus. To earn cum laude honors in chemistry, a student must satisfy one of the following criteria: (1) an overall GPA of 3.2 or better and a chemistry GPA of 3.5 or better; or (2) an overall GPA of 3.2, a chemistry GPA of 3.2 or better, and six hours of CHEM 4840, Independent Study, spread over a minimum of two semesters. To earn magna cum laude or summa cum laude honors in chemistry, a student must satisfy each of the following criteria: an overall GPA of 3.2 or better, a chemistry GPA of 3.5 or better; six hours of CHEM 4840, Independent Study, spread over a minimum of two semesters with a GPA of 3.1 or better; and presentation of a thesis on the independent study research to a faculty advisory committee. The committee decides if magna cum laude or summa cum laude honors are to be awarded.

REQUIREMENTS FOR MINOR 

Graduate

The MS degree offered at the Downtown Campus is a broad-based chemistry degree that allows students to take courses and do research in the following basic fields: analytical, biochemistry, inorganic, organic, physical or environmental chemistry.

The MS program is available to both full- and part-time students. The chemistry faculty strive to ensure that students receive excellent advising and supervision of work. Students enrolled in the program have an opportunity to be appointed as laboratory teaching assistants. Research activities on the part of the chemistry faculty provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain research assistantships.

CHEMISTRY MS 

BS/MS PROGRAM 

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